Cheapest Cars to Insure After 25 Years Old

Once you turn 25, car insurance gets more affordable. But it's important to choose the right car to maximize your savings.

Best cars for 25-year-olds — based on insurance costs


Once you turn 25, you reap the benefits of reduced insurance premiums. Your additional maturity and driving experience lead to reduced insurance rates — as well as the ability to affordably rent vehicles. Since it's always worthwhile to save on auto insurance, let’s explore the cheapest vehicles to insure once you're older than 25.


What's the best vehicle for insurance after age 25?
  1. Cheapest trucks
  2. Cheapest SUVs
  3. Cheapest vans
  4. Cheapest sedans
  5. How to find cheap car insurance after 25
  6. Methodology




Cheapest trucks to insure


Given their towing and hauling power, trucks hover on the higher end of the insurance-price spectrum. If you're looking for the cheapest truck to insure, start your search with the Nissan Frontier or the Chevy Colorado. These pickup trucks will set you back approximately $130 less in insurance costs each year than a typical truck — and their list prices are relatively affordable.


Annual Insurance Rates for Pickup Trucks

Truck Make/Model List Price Premium
Chevrolet Colorado $20,000 $1,454
Chevrolet Silverado $27,785 $1,507
Ford F-Series $27,110 $1,409
GMC Canyon $20,885 $1,511
GMC Sierra $28,405 $1,504
Honda Ridgeline $29,475 $1,675
Nissan Frontier $18,390 $1,365
Nissan Titan $29,580 $1,761
Toyota Tacoma $23,660 $1,629
Toyota Tundra $23,660 $1,596




Cheapest SUVs to insure


SUVs are among the most popular vehicle types. They're not as bulky or as costly to insure as pickup trucks, but they maintain more versatility than sedans or coupes. Moreover, they tend to cost much less than a pickup truck to insure or buy. On average, an SUV costs $1,579 per year to insure. The Ford Escape is the cheapest SUV to insure.


Annual Insurance Rates for an SUV

SUV Make/Model List Price Premium
Honda CR-V $24,045 $1,230
Jeep Cherokee $23,698 $1,270
Ford Escape $23,695 $1,272
Chevrolet Equinox $22,120 $1,272
Jeep Wrangler $23,995 $1,292
Subaru Forester $22,395 $1,324
Toyota Rav4 $24,140 $1,329
Nissan Rogue $23,820 $1,338
Ford Explorer $30,185 $1,354
Jeep Grand Cherokee $30,395 $1,391




Cheapest minivans to insure


If you're considering upgrading to a family-friendly vehicle, you're probably shopping for a minivan. Despite their stodgy reputation, minivans come in handy when it comes to transporting kids. Plus, minivans are fairly inexpensive to insure. On average, a minivan will set you back $1,484 to insure each year, or about $742 for a standard six-month policy. Below are some popular vans and their corresponding insurance premiums.


Annual Insurance Rates for Minivans

Minivan Make/Model List Price Premium
Chrysler Pacifica $26,995 $1,498
Chrysler Town and Country $29,995 $1,363
Dodge Grand Caravan $26,250 $1,451
Honda Odyssey $30,090 $1,307
Kia Sedona $27,000 $1,421
Nissan Quest $26,580 $1,531
Toyota Sienna $30,750 $1,637




Cheapest sedans to insure


Sedans are among the lowest-priced vehicle types, but our data show insurance rates for sedans can be quite high. On average, a sedan is slightly more expensive than is a minivan or SUV to insure. Of the makes and models analyzed, the Chevy Cruze was the cheapest to insure, with an annual premium of $1,372.


Annual Insurance Rates for Popular Sedans

Sedan Make/Model List Price Premium
Chevrolet Cruze $16,975 $1,372
Honda Accord $23,570 $1,421
Hyundai Elantra $16,950 $1,445
Ford Fusion $22,215 $1,444
Honda Civic $22,050 $1,463
Hyundai Sonata $18,940 $1,454
Nissan Sentra $16,990 $1,465
Toyota Camry $23,495 $1,478
Toyota Corolla $18,600 $1,329
Nissan Altima $23,260 $1,486




Finding cheap car Insurance after 25: what to consider


When you’re looking for the best car insurance for experienced drivers, consider what your vehicle says about you. While your heart might be set on pickup truck, your wallet might not be. If you’re really looking to save, you should consider a vehicle with a lower cost-to-insure. Even though you've hit the age of 25 and earned a break from young driver car insurance rates, you’re still probably paying more than you’d like.

If you’re seeking savings, consider discounts to make your premium more affordable. The best way to save on car insurance is to do your research and choose the correct insurance company for you. While the above data shows average rates by vehicle type, make, and model, considerable variability exists between what you'd pay to insure a Nissan Titan with State Farm versus Nationwide.

This doesn’t take into account at-fault accidents, tickets, or other violations that may lead to premium increases. The best way to find car insurance that fits you is to assess multiple companies' offerings with your vehicle and driving profile in mind. Our comparison app provides a quick and easy way to get free rates online today — just enter your zip code below.


Shop insurance rates and save!




Additional resources


Still shopping? See our articles below for company car insurance rates for your make and model!





Method to our madness: this is how we do it


Between September and December 2017, The Zebra conducted comprehensive auto insurance pricing analysis using its proprietary quote engine, comprising data from insurance rating platforms and public rate filings. The Zebra examined nearly 53 million rates to explore trends for specific auto insurance rating factors across all United States zip codes, averaged by state, including Washington, DC.

Analysis used a consistent base profile for the insured driver: a 30-year-old single male driving a 2013 Honda Accord EX with a good driving history and coverage limits of $50,000 bodily injury liability per person/$100,000 bodily injury liability per accident/$50,000 property damage liability per accident with a $500 deductible for comprehensive and collision. For coverage level data, optional coverage (that must be rejected in writing) is included where applicable, including uninsured motorist coverage and personal injury protection.

National property and casualty losses information is from the Insurance Information Institute and the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information U.S. Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters report.

For vehicle make and model data, analysis referenced the most popular vehicles in the U.S. by 2016 year-end sales, according to Goodcarbadcar.net’s automakers’ data.

Some rate data may vary slightly throughout report based on rounding.