Car Insurance for Bad Drivers in Illinois

The Zebra
Feb. 18, 2019

If you have caused a car crash, filed a claim, or received a citation for a serious violation, you could be a candidate for high-risk auto insurance. Car insurance for high-risk drivers is commonly expensive, but the degree of price increase you receive varies depending on your auto insurance company, your driving record, and the state in which you drive.


What goes into auto insurance rates for high-risk drivers in Illinois:

  1. At-fault accidents
  2. Speeding
  3. Distracted driving
  4. Racing
  5. Reckless driving
  6. View Illinois driving laws

Find an affordable policy today!

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What impact does an at-fault accident have on auto insurance in Illinois?


If you are deemed accountable for causing an auto accident, you should expect your car insurance rates to increase. In Illinois, the average insurance premium after an at-fault crash is $1,675, versus the national average of $2,012. A major incident like an at-fault crash can stay on your insurance record for up to three years!


ILLINOIS CAR INSURANCE RATES AFTER AN AT-FAULT COLLISION
LocationWith At-Fault Accident — Annual RateNo At-Fault Accident — Annual RateAnnual Rate Increase
Illinois$1,675$1,120$555
U.S. Average$2,012$1,397$615

The best insurance company after an at-fault accident in Illinois is GEICO. GEICO’s premiums usually increase after an incident by $676, resulting in a premium 40 percent less expensive than the average among all insurance companies after a crash. If you've been deemed at fault in an accident in Illinois, avoid American Family and Progressive, which penalize at-fault drivers more severely.


CAR INSURANCE PREMIUMS AFTER AN AT-FAULT COLLISION IN ILLINOIS — CHEAP COMPANIES
Insurance CompanyAnnual Premium After an At-Fault Crash
GEICO$999
Country$1,098
State Farm$1,296
American Family$1,720
Progressive$2,217


Does a speeding ticket increase car insurance rates in Illinois?


One of the ways in which drivers earn the "bad driver" tag is speeding. In Illinois, car insurance premiums rise by $390 per year post-speeding ticket, to an average yearly rate of $1,510.


ILLINOIS AUTO INSURANCE RATES AFTER A SPEEDING TICKET
LocationWith a Speeding Ticket — Annual RateNo Speeding Ticket — Annual RateAnnual Rate Increase
Illinois$1,510$1,120$390
National Average$1,727$1,397$330

The foolproof way to find cheap insurance after getting a ticket for speeding is to shop thoroughly and weigh the available options. The cheapest auto insurance with a speeding ticket in Illinois is available through Country. Country’s average premium after a violation is $627 less than the state average. If you're caught speeding in Illinois, Allstate is worth avoiding.


AUTO INSURANCE PRICES AFTER A SPEEDING VIOLATION IN ILLINOIS — CHEAP CARRIERS
Insurance CompanyAnnual Premium With a Speeding Violation
Country$883
State Farm$1,178
American Family$1,286
Progressive$1,702
Allstate$1,802


How does a distracted driving violation affect car insurance in Illinois?


If you are issued a distracted driving citation, expect to pay a premium for your auto insurance. In Illinois, car insurance rates typically go up by $247 each year. That's a 22% increase from the average annual premium in Illinois, and 43% more than the national average cost of car insurance with a ticket for distracted driving.


ILLINOIS CAR INSURANCE RATES AFTER A DISTRACTED DRIVING CITATION
LocationWith Distracted Driving — Annual RateNo Distracted Driving — Annual RateAnnual Rate Increase
Illinois$1,367$1,120$247
National Average$1,570$1,397$173

The best way to find cheap auto insurance in the wake of a distracted driving infraction is to compare carriers. The most affordable insurer after a ticket for distracted driving in Illinois is GEICO, with an average rate of just $721 per year, 47% less than the average distracted driving insurance rate among top insurers.


AUTO INSURANCE RATES AFTER DISTRACTED DRIVING IN ILLINOIS — AFFORDABLE PROVIDERS
InsurerAnnual Rate With Distracted Driving
GEICO$721
Country$856
State Farm$1,022
Progressive$1,198
American Family$1,286

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How does a citation for racing impact Illinois car insurance rates?


Racing is considered an extraordinarily serious offense. Auto insurance carriers frequently penalize racing convictions severely — in fact, Illinois car insurance prices increase by an average of $1,549 per year following a ticket for racing. That represents a 138% increase on the average annual auto insurance rate in Illinois!


LocationWith a Racing Citation — Annual RateNo Racing Citation — Annual RateYearly Rate Increase
Illinois$2,669$1,120$1,549
National Average$2,397$1,397$1,000

If you have been ticketed for racing, do your due diligence and shop around for the best rates. In Illinois, grab a quote from GEICO, offering premiums 54 percent less than the state average after a citation for racing.


CAR INSURANCE RATES AFTER RACING IN ILLINOIS — AFFORDABLE COMPANIES
CompanyAnnual Rate With Racing
GEICO$1,230
State Farm$1,484
Progressive$1,845
American Family$1,957
Allstate$2,157


Will a reckless driving ticket raise my auto insurance rates in Illinois?


One of the most serious driving violations, reckless driving is a certain way to raise your insurance rates. Car insurance companies increase rates by $1,282 annually following a reckless driving ticket. That amounts to 115% higher than the average insurance rate in Illinois, and 60% less than the U.S. average penalty for reckless driving.


ILLINOIS CAR INSURANCE PRICES WITH A RECKLESS DRIVING CITATION
LocationWith Reckless Driving — Annual RateNo Reckless Driving — Annual RateAnnual Rate Increase
Illinois$2,402$1,120$1,282
U.S. Average$2,395$1,397$998

If you're looking for car insurance after a reckless driving ticket, shop around to find the cheapest rate. In Illinois, the best underwriter after reckless driving is GEICO.


AUTO INSURANCE RATES AFTER A RECKLESS DRIVING CITATION IN ILLINOIS — AFFORDABLE CARRIERS
CompanyAnnual Rate After Reckless Driving
GEICO$1,230
State Farm$1,484
Progressive$1,557
American Family$1,957
Allstate$2,157

If you're looking for car insurance as a high-risk driver, the best thing to do is to do plenty of research and compare policies from trusted insurers.


Compare car insurance rates today!

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Traffic laws in Illinois penalize drivers who endanger the lives of other motorists and pedestrians or threaten to damage property belonging to others. Illinois prohibits drivers from speeding, driving recklessly or while distracted, and racing. Drivers must also maintain proper and active insurance coverage and must adhere to the law after being involved in a car accident.

Speeding in Illinois

When Are You Speeding In Illinois?

Drivers are speeding in Illinois when speeds exceed a speed that is reasonable or proper in relation to traffic conditions or the roadway, or at a speed that endangers people or property.

Drivers must reduce speeds when:

  • Approaching and crossing an intersection
  • Approaching or rounding a curve
  • Cresting a hill
  • Traveling upon a narrow or winding road
  • Other special hazards or inclement weather conditions exist

Illinois speed limits:

  • 30 miles per hour in urban districts
  • 15 miles per hour in alleys in urban districts
  • 65 miles per hour on designated highways outside of urban districts with at least four lanes of traffic and a separation between roadways moving in opposite directions
  • 55 miles per hour on all other highways, roads, and streets outside of urban districts
  • 70 miles per hour on interstate highways outside an urban district
  • 65 miles per hour on all or parts of designated highways with at least four lanes of traffic and a separation between roadways moving in opposite directions
  • 20 miles per hour in school zones, on roadways on public school property, or on thoroughfares where children pass to go to and from school while students are present

 

Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and Will counties have or may have defined lower maximum speed limits. Drivers are cautioned to pay attention to posted speed limits when driving in Illinois.

Drivers in Illinois must not drive at so low a speed as to impede the normal flow of traffic.

Penalties for Speeding In Illinois

Driving at speeds in excess of one to 20 miles per hour in Illinois results in a $120 fine.

Speeding in excess of 21 to 25 miles per hour in Illinois results in a $140 fine.

Speeding in Illinois in excess of 26 to 34 miles per hour over the speed limit is a class B misdemeanor and results in:

  • Up to six months in jail
  • Up to $1,500 in fines

Speeding by more than 35 miles per hour or more over the speed limit in Illinois is a class A misdemeanor and leads to:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • Up to $2,500 in fines

In addition, speeders in Illinois will accumulate points against their driver’s license for each speeding violation, eventually culminating in the loss of driving privileges. Offenders are given:

  • Five points for speeding one to 10 miles per hour over the limit
  • 15 points for speeding 11 to 14 miles per hour over the limit
  • 20 points for speeding 15 to 25 miles per hour over the limit
  • 50 points for speeding more than 25 miles per hour over the limit

Speeding in a school zone is considered a petty offense with a maximum fine of $1,000. First-time offenders are also subject to a minimum fine of $150. Second or subsequent offenses result in a minimum fine of $300.

 

Reckless Driving in Illinois

What Is Reckless Driving in Illinois?

Reckless driving in Illinois occurs when a driver operates a vehicle with a “willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.” Driving a vehicle and using an incline in a roadway to cause the vehicle to become airborne also constitutes reckless driving in Illinois.

Penalties for Reckless Driving in Illinois

Reckless driving in Illinois is a class A misdemeanor and results in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • Up to $2,500 in fines
  • 55 points on a driver’s license

Reckless driving that causes bodily harm to a child or school crossing guard who is performing official duties is a class 4 felony and leads to:

  • One to three years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines
  • 55 points on a driver’s license

Aggravated reckless driving in Illinois is an act of reckless driving that leads to great bodily harm, permanently disability, or disfigurement to another is a class 4 felony and results in:

  • One to three years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines
  • 55 points on a driver’s license

Reckless driving that causes great bodily harm, permanent disability, or disfigurement to a child or an on-duty crossing guard is considered aggravated reckless driving and a class 3 felony that results in:

  • Two to five years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines
  • 55 points on a driver’s license

 

Distracted Driving in Illinois

What is Distracted Driving in Illinois?

Illinois prohibits the use of handheld wireless devices, such as cell phones, while driving. Drivers are also prohibited from using headsets while driving but are allowed to use single-sided headsets or earpieces. Drivers who are age 19 or older are allowed to use hands-free devices and Bluetooth.

In all cases, Illinois considers the activation of even hands-free technology to constitute distracted driving. Drivers are recommended to pull over before using any wireless device functions. Furthermore, drivers cannot physically hold a device, even while using hands-free technology or the speakerphone function.

Distracted driving in Illinois may also be caused by:

  • Grooming
  • Reading or writing
  • Changing the radio settings
  • Adjusting seat positions
  • Changing the temperature
  • Eating, drinking, or smoking
  • Talking to passengers
  • Cleaning the car while driving

Read here for more on texting and driving statistics.

Penalties for Distracted Driving in Illinois

Those who are under the age of 19 or those who use a cell phone while in a school zone, work zone, or within 500 feet of an emergency scene are penalized in accordance to the Illinois cell phone law.

The first or second distracted driving conviction in Illinois is considered a petty offense and results in a $1,000 fine.

A third or subsequent conviction for distracted driving in Illinois is a class C misdemeanor and results in a fine of $1,500.

Offenders who opt to pay their ticket in lieu of going to court are fined $120 instead of either of the above fines.

Distracted driving that leads to great bodily harm or permanent disability or disfigurement is classified as “aggravated use of a wireless telephone.” Such offenses are considered class-A misdemeanors, resulting in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • Up to $2,500 in fines

A conviction for aggravated use of a wireless telephone that leads to a fatality is a class 4 felony and leads to:

  • One to three years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

Use of any electronic device, including cell phones, while in other locations in Illinois can also result in a conviction for distracted driving under the Illinois electronic communication device law.

Those found in violation of the electronic communication device law are subject to fines of:

  • $75 for the first offense
  • $100 for a second offense
  • $125 for a third offense
  • $150 for fourth or subsequent offenses

Driving while distracted by an electronic communication device and causing great bodily harm or permanent disability or disfigurement to another is considered “aggravated use of an electronic communication device” — a class A misdemeanor that results in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • Up to $2,500 in fines

Aggravated use of an electronic communication device that results in a fatality is a class 4 felony and leads to:

  • One to three years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

Distracted driving will result in points against a driver’s license based on the severity of the offense.

 

Racing in Illinois

What is Racing in Illinois?

It is illegal to take part in or allow your vehicle to take part in racing in Illinois. Racing and street racing in Illinois is defined as the:

  • Operation of 2 or more vehicles from a point side by side at accelerating speeds in a competitive attempt to outdistance each other
  • Operation of one or more vehicles over a common selected course, each starting at the same point, for the purpose of comparing the relative speeds or power of acceleration of such vehicle or vehicles within a certain distance or time limit
  • Use of one or more vehicles in an attempt to outgain or outdistance another vehicle
  • Use of one or more vehicles to prevent another vehicle from passing
  • Use of one or more vehicles to arrive at a given destination ahead of another vehicle or vehicles
  • Use of one or more vehicles to test the physical stamina or endurance of drivers over long-distance driving routes

Penalties for Racing in Illinois

A first-time conviction for racing in Illinois is a class A misdemeanor and results in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • $250 to $2,500 in fines
  • License revocation

A second or subsequent conviction for racing in Illinois is a class 4 felony and leads to:

  • One to three years in jail
  • $500 to $25,000 in fines
  • License revocation

Drivers are guilty of aggravated street racing if they are involved in an accident that causes “great bodily harm or permanent disability or disfigurement to another.” Aggravated street racing is a class 4 felony and results in:

  • One to 12 years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

Drivers who allow others to use their vehicles for the purpose of street racing are guilty of a class B misdemeanor, leading to:

  • Up to six months in jail
  • Up to $1,500 in fines

A second or subsequent conviction for allowing someone else to use your vehicle for the purpose of a street race is a class A misdemeanor and results in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • $250 to $2,500 in fines

Drivers are also subject to points against their license for racing in Illinois.

 

At-fault Accidents in Illinois

What is An At-fault Accident in Illinois?

Illinois is a fault-based state when assigning fault after an accident. To determine fault, Illinois uses a “comparative fault” rule, which means both parties may share some degree of fault for an accident. Any party whose share of fault is less than 50 percent will be entitled to compensation equal to the percent for which they are not at fault for the accident.

For example, if a driver is found to be at 25 percent fault for an accident and entitled to an award of $100,000, the driver would only be awarded actual compensation of $75,000.

Illinois has a mandatory insurance law which requires all drivers to have minimum liability insurance of:

  • $25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person
  • $50,000 for total bodily injury or death
  • $20,000 for property damage

All car insurance policies in Illinois include uninsured motorist coverage equal to the policy’s injury liability coverage amount.

In addition to maintaining minimum car insurance coverage amounts, drivers involved in an accident in Illinois must file an accident report within 10 days of an accident that:

  • Caused property damage of $1,000 or more
  • Led to death or bodily injury

Drivers in Illinois should remain on the scene of an accident in which they're involved, whether or not injury or fatality occurs.

Penalties for At-fault Accidents in Illinois

The first and second offense for driving while uninsured in Illinois results in:

  • $501 to $1,000 in fines
  • License suspension for three months
  • Vehicle registration suspended for up to three months

A third or subsequent offense for driving while uninsured in Illinois leads to:

  • At least $1,000 in fines
  • An additional $1,000 fine if registration is still suspended
  • License suspension for four months
  • Vehicle registration suspended for four months
  • Required SR-22 financial responsibility certificate for three years

Being found at-fault for an accident while driving uninsured in Illinois subjects offenders to additional fines and suspension periods, as well as liability for providing compensation to the affected parties.

Failure to remain on the scene of an accident in which $1,000 or more of property damage has been caused is a class A misdemeanor and results in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • $250 to $2,500 in fines
  • License suspension

Leaving the scene of an accident in which property damage has occurred is a class A misdemeanor, resulting in:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • $250 to $2,500 in fines

Failure to remain on the scene of an accident involving injury or death is a class 4 felony and leads to:

  • One to three years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

Failing to report an accident that led to injury is a class 2 felony and results in:

  • Three to seven years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

Failing to report an accident in which a victim dies is a class 1 felony, leading to:

  • Four to 15 years in jail
  • Up to $25,000 in fines

 

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