Car Insurance Rates By Marital/Familial Status

Why do married drivers pay less for car insurance?
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Ava Lynch

Insurance Analyst

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Ava joined The Zebra as a writer and licensed insurance agent in 2016. She now works as a senior insurance contributor, providing insights and data a…

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How does your relationship status affect auto insurance rates?

Your personal relationship status does have an impact on what you pay for car insurance. Because married drivers are seen as more financially stable and safer drivers, they typically pay less for car insurance. On average, a married driver pays $149 less per year for car insurance than does a single, widowed or divorced driver. Let’s explore car insurance rates by marital status and tips to save, no matter your marital status.

Average Annual Premium by Marital Status
Marital Status Avg. Annual Premium
Single $1,760
Divorced $1,759
Widowed $1,665
Married $1,611

The Zebra’s Dynamic Insurance Rating Tool data methodology — auto insurance

The auto insurance rates displayed throughout this page come from The Zebra’s Dynamic Insurance Rating Tool, a proprietary insurance premium estimator that uses the most recent rate filings across the United States at the ZIP code level to provide up-to-date rate data. Most insurance companies file car insurance rates one to two times a year. This data comes from Quadrant Information Services, which sources the latest approved rate filings across carriers in each state from S&P Global. Quadrant then uses an internal QA process to validate the information and build reports before the data is programmed into The Zebra’s dynamic rating tool.

Rates are based on a sample driver profile — a 30-year-old single male driver with a Honda Accord and full coverage at these levels:

  • $50,000 per person/$100,000 per incident for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per incident for property damage liability
  • $500 deductibles for collision and comprehensive coverage

To provide insight to consumers on how specific personal factors (like age, location and coverage level) can affect your premium, this base profile is then adjusted for different factors commonly used by insurance companies. For more information, see our full data methodology.

Do married couples pay less for car insurance?

The average married couple pays $134 per month for car insurance — or $805 for a standard six-month policy. This rate is relatively reasonable because data paint married drivers as "safe" insurance clients. Married people are often homeowners and will bundle their policies, cover multiple vehicles and insure more than one driver on one policy, i.e., the policyholder and their spouse.

Data show that married couples file fewer claims than single, divorced or widowed drivers. These factors contribute to their classification as less-risky insurance clients.

For more information on car insurance for married couples, including company specific-rates, consult our resources:

wedding rings

How much do single drivers pay for car insurance?

The average single driver in the US pays $1,760 per year for car insurance — about $880 for a standard six-month policy. Depending on your age, credit score, driving history and vehicle, your premium may differ, as this data is based on a national average (methodology).

For more information regarding car insurance as a single driver, see our articles below.

How does car insurance change after a divorce?

The average divorced driver in the US pays $1,759 per year for car insurance. This is $148 more than a married driver. It’s important to consider that you’re not being punished for being divorced. This is simply a reflection of historical data and statistical correlation. Divorced drivers file more claims than married drivers. Thus, their premiums are slightly higher than married drivers.

However, there are some ways to lower your premium after a divorce. Check out our guide to see tips on how to handle your policy.

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Car insurance for widowed drivers

There is the least premium difference between married drivers and widowed drivers. On average, widowers pay $1,665 per year for car insurance — $54 more than a married driver. Like other marital statuses, this has to do with the risk profile of a widowed client. While not as risky as a divorced or single driver, a widowed driver is statistically more likely to get into an accident and file a claim than a married driver. Thus, the more expensive premium.

The death of an insurance policyholder comes with some implications.  Reference our guide to finding free online insurance quotes and handling insurance changes after the death of a spouse.

Get car insurance for you or your family today!

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About The Zebra

The Zebra is not an insurance company. We publish data-backed, expert-reviewed resources to help consumers make more informed insurance decisions.

  • The Zebra’s insurance content is written and reviewed for accuracy by licensed insurance agents.
  • The Zebra’s insurance editorial content is not subject to review or alteration by insurance companies or partners.
  • The Zebra’s editorial team operates independently of the company’s partnerships and commercialization interests, publishing unbiased information for consumer benefit.
  • The auto insurance rates published on The Zebra’s pages are based on a comprehensive analysis of car insurance pricing data, evaluating more than 83 million insurance rates from across the United States.